Literature

 

Welcome to the literature area of the FIC Web site. Here you will find a collection of articles, books, fact sheets and technical memos, reports and studies related to saving farm and ranch land and supporting agriculture. You can filter by state, topic and/or type of document ("category"). Use the Search feature to conduct a more refined search.

Title: The Rural Design Workbook: Rethinking Conventional Development
Publisher: Corning, NY: Southern Tier Central Regional Planning and Development Board , Publication Name: The Rural Design Workbook
Body:

This workbook is an easy-to-use collection of real-life development designs and recommended land use language for use by municipal planning boards as they review subdivision and site plan proposals. It has been developed by the Southern Tier Central Regional Planning and Development Board in conjunction with classes in Cornell University’s Landscape Architecture program, and emphasizes design which promotes environmental health and conservation, preserves the rural character, and provides financial benefits or alternatives.

Date: Sunday, September 1, 2002 , Author: Southern Tier Central Regional Planning and Development Board
Nid: 30959
Title: The Rural Design Workbook: Village of Painted Post Zoning Law
Publisher: Corning, NY: Southern Tier Central Regional Planning and Development Board , Publication Name: The Rural Design Workbook
Body:

A law to promote the health, safety, morals and general welfare of the Village of Painted Post; regulating and restricting the height, number of stories, and size of buildings and other structures, the percentage of lot that may be occupied, the size of yards, courts and other open spaces, the density of population, and the location and use of buildings, structures and land for trade, industry, residence, or other purposes; creating districts for said purposes, and establishing the boundaries thereof; and establishing a Zoning Board of Appeals to determine and vary the application of such regulations and restrictions in harmony with their general purposes and intent.

Date: Sunday, September 1, 2002 , Author: Southern Tier Central Regional Planning and Development Board , Page Numbers: 95
Nid: 38759
Title: The Sale of Development Rights and Zoning in the Preservation of Open Space: Lindahl Equilibrium and a Case Study
Publisher: Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press , Publication Name: Land Economics , Date: Sunday, February 1, 1981 , Author: G. Wolfram , Page Numbers: 398-413
Nid: 29750
Title: The Soil and Water Conservationist of Tomorrow
Nid: 32675
Title: The Soil Conservation Service Money Situation: How It Will Affect Districts
Publisher: Norman A. Berg
Body:

From a speech given at the annual meeting of tne National Assocation of Soil and Water Conservation Districts in Dallas, Texas.

Date: Monday, February 5, 1968 , Author: Norman A. Berg , Page Numbers: 6
Nid: 32672
Title: The Soil Conservation Service Role with Planning Districts
Publisher: Norman A. Berg
Body:

From a speech given at a meeting of Virginia Soil and Water Conservation District members.

Date: Thursday, April 29, 1971 , Author: Norman A. Berg , Page Numbers: 13
Nid: 32674
Title: The Soil Conservation Service: Its Future Role in Natural Resource and Land Use Planning
Publisher: Norman A. Berg
Body:

From a speech given at a meeting of the Water Management Association of Ohio in Washington, DC.

Date: Wednesday, February 27, 1974 , Author: Norman A. Berg , Page Numbers: 18
Nid: 32676
Title: The State of Our Service
Publisher: Norman A. Berg
Body:

From a speech given at a meeting of Soil Conservation Service employees in Columbus, Ohio.

Date: Wednesday, October 11, 1972 , Author: Norman A. Berg , Page Numbers: 33
Nid: 32678
Title: The Story County Local Food System: Issues and Opportunities
Publisher: Nevada, IA: Story County Planning and Zoning Department
Body:

Everywhere we look, whether it is the television, a newspaper article, or billboard, we see more and more people exclaiming the importance of “eating local”. What is less clear is why it is important and what if anything Story County can do to facilitate this growing movement. The purpose of this report is review over nine months of ongoing research by County planning and zoning staff that attempts to answer these questions.

First, this report defines exactly what “eating local” means and the definition of food systems planning. Second, this report discusses the many ways citizens and decision-makers have found local food systems planning to be important, as well as the benefits it can bring to our community. Next, the report looks at what the State of Iowa and two counties in the Midwest are doing to facilitate the local food system.

Finally, this report recommends that the Board of Supervisors consider forming a local food systems steering committee comprised of local stakeholders, food systems experts and citizens to discuss issues and opportunities in the Story Country Region including:
- Public education of local food issues;
- Institutional purchasing of local foods;
- Regional collaboration on food system issues and policies;
- Recruiting and retaining more local food growers;
- Niche farming opportunities;
- Feasibility for a regional food processing facility;
- Allowing for small acreage farming; and
- Fostering more equitable access to healthy foods

Date: Monday, September 1, 2008 , Author: Story County Planning and Zoning Department , Page Numbers: 19
Nid: 37280
Title: The Urbanization of Agricultural Land: A Review of The National Agricultural Lands Study
Publisher: Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press , Publication Name: Land Economics , Date: Monday, February 1, 1982 , Author: W.A. Fischel , Page Numbers: 236-259
Nid: 29749
Title: The Wisconsin Farmland Preservation Program
Publisher: Ankeny, IA: Soil and Water Conservation Society , Publication Name: Journal of Soil and Water Conservation , Date: Sunday, January 1, 1978 , Author: Richard Barrows and Douglas Yanggen , Page Numbers: 209-212
Nid: 29562
Title: Think Globally - Eat Locally: San Francisco Foodshed Assessment
Publisher: Davis, CA: American Farmland Trust , Publication Name: AFT Publication
Body:

American Farmland Trust was challenged by the San Francisco Foundation to investigate how and to what extent people in the City could improve their well-being and reduce their global “footprint” by eating locally, say, from sources of food within 100 miles of the Golden Gate. This publication documents our search for answers– those we found as well as those we didn’t–and recommends a broad course of action aimed at enabling San Francisco and neighboring communities to take better advantage of local sources of food and, thereby, also help the agricultural economy of its “foodshed.”

Date: Monday, September 1, 2008 , Author: Edward Thompson, Jr., Alethea Marie Harper and Sibella Kraus , Page Numbers: 48
Nid: 37187
Title: Thirty Years of Farmland Preservation in North America: Discourses and Ideologies of a Movement
Publisher: Bristol, UK: Journal of Rural Studies , Publication Name: Journal of Rural Studies
Body:

Thirty years after it first captured public attention, farmland
preservation in North America remains a contentious issue which has failed to mature into an integrated element of rural land use planning. This paper argues that the explanation for this lies in the examination of the public discourses of the farmland preservation movement and the ideologies that underpin them. The evolution of popular and academic discourses and the influence of environmental and agrarian ideology are explored. This reveals an expanding discourse with ideological foundations riven with internal contradictions yet intersecting in different ways. The result has been a policy agenda influenced by a shift to increasingly broader motivations for farmland preservation and controlled by largely non-farm interests. Farmers, however, remain at the centre of the issue, cast in roles ranging from guarantors of food supply to guardians of nature, open space and rural community. Yet farm voices are barely detectable in the discourse of the farmland preservation movement. This illustrates the representative power of discourse and suggests why farmland preservation remains a contentious policy issue.

Date: Wednesday, April 1, 1998 , Author: Michael Bunce , Page Numbers: 233-247
Nid: 29777
Title: This Is Smart Growth
Publisher: Washington, DC: Smart Growth Network and International City/County Management Association
Body:

If you’ve heard the term smart growth and want to know what it actually looks like, this publication is a good starting point. If you’re already familiar with smart growth ideas, this publication can help you educate others. It contains many examples of how smart growth principles have been applied in cities, suburbs, small towns, and rural areas; some of these examples may look much like your own community.

Date: Sunday, January 1, 2006 , Author: Dan Emerine and Christine Shenot , Page Numbers: 32
Nid: 38207
Title: This Land Is Your Land--All 171 Pages of It
Publisher: Norman A. Berg
Body:

From a speech given at a meeting of the Charleston Soil and Water Conservation District in Charleston, South Carolina.

Date: Tuesday, July 27, 1971 , Author: Norman A. Berg , Page Numbers: 12
Nid: 32679
Title: This Was the Start of Something Big
Publisher: Norman A. Berg
Body:

From a speech given at the 40-year commemoration of Berry's Gully in Spartanburg, South Carolina.

Date: Friday, June 7, 1974 , Author: Norman A. Berg , Page Numbers: 9
Nid: 32680
Title: Time on Your Side: New Initiative Helps Counties Structure Installment Purchase Agreements
Publisher: Northampton, MA: American Farmland Trust , Publication Name: Connection
Body:

Pennsylvania farmland protection officials retooled their installment purchase
agreement (IPA) program and launched a public information campaign to
encourage both counties and landowners to use IPAs to conserve more farmland.
IPAs allow a landowner to defer capital gains taxes for up to 30 years and collect
interest from the county on the balance of the easement price. That interest, which
may average 5.5 to 5.7 percent, is tax-free. Thus, an IPA relieves landowners of a significant
tax burden while offering interest payments twice a year. They benefit municipalities because they can stretch limited budgets by paying off easements over 20 to 30 years. Negotiations include setting
the easement purchase price, the amount to be paid on the closing date and the
principal amount to be paid over the next few decades.

Date: Sunday, July 1, 2001 , Author: Valerie Berton , Page Numbers: 1-2
Nid: 27734
Title: To Market, To Market
Publisher: Burlington, VT: Planning Comissioners Journal , Publication Name: Planning Commissioners Journal
Body:

Now numbering more than 2,400 nationwide, local farmers' markets provide one of the best ways of increasing downtown activity, while offering a valuable outlet for area farmers. Author and lecturer Roberta Brandes Gratz takes a closer look at the role farmers' markets can play -- and why they've become so popular.

Date: Tuesday, May 1, 2001 , Author: Roberta Brandes Gratz , Page Numbers: 4
Nid: 29809
Title: Today's "Changing" Resource Picture
Publisher: Norman A. Berg
Body:

From a speech given before the National Association of Conservation Districts Business Advisory Committee in Chicago, Illinois.

Date: Tuesday, October 8, 1968 , Author: Norman A. Berg , Page Numbers: 8
Nid: 32699
Title: Today's Challenge to Conservation Education
Publisher: Norman A. Berg
Body:

From a speech given at the summer meeting of the Iowa Chapter of the Soil Conservation Society of America in Boone, Iowa.

Date: Friday, June 19, 1970 , Author: Norman A. Berg , Page Numbers: 23
Nid: 32698

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