Literature

 

Welcome to the literature area of the FIC Web site. Here you will find a collection of articles, books, fact sheets and technical memos, reports and studies related to saving farm and ranch land and supporting agriculture. You can filter by state, topic and/or type of document ("category"). Use the Search feature to conduct a more refined search.

Title: Alquiler de granjas: Propietarios y arrendatarios de granjas exitosos
Publisher: Northampton, MA: American Farmland Trust
Body:

This fact sheet, translated here in Spanish, provides basic information about leasing farmland. It is one in a collection of fact sheets produced as part of American Farmland Trust's Farmland Advisors project which created and trained a network of 80 professionals to provide guidance to farmers and farmland owners. Topics include: transitioning land to the next generation, finding a farmer to work the land, and matching farm seekers with farm owners.Air Jordan XI 11 Wool

Date: Thursday, October 1, 2015 , Author: Farmland Advisors, translated by Maria Rojas , Page Numbers: 2
Nid: 1983911485
Title: Alternatives for Future Growth in the Tri-River Region
Publisher: Ft. Collins, CO: American Farmland Trust , Publication Name: AFT Publication
Body:

Increasing population pressures are threatening to strain current systems of growth and land protecton measures in Colorado's Tri-River Region. Delta, Mesa, Montrose and Ouray counties are home to some of our state's most valuable agricultural land and important conservation areas.

Using county and municipal data, analysts evaluated how land use policies might influence development patterns, and estimated their associated costs to local governments in Delta, Mesa, Montrose and Ouray counties in Colorado.Nike Benassi Slide

Date: Saturday, January 1, 2000 , Author: American Farmland Trust , Page Numbers: 4
Nid: 36431
Title: Alternatives for Future Urban Growth in California's Central Valley: The Bottom Line for Agriculture and Taxpayers
Publisher: Davis, CA: American Farmland Trust , Publication Name: AFT Publication
Body:

California’s Central Valley is the nation’s most important agricultural resource, producing 250 different commodities worth more than $13 billion a year. The valley’s population is expected to triple between now and the year 2040, putting tremendous pressure on agricultural land and public services. Low-density urban sprawl would consume more than 1 million acres of farmland by 2040 and could reduce the value of agricultural products grown in the Central Valley by about $2.1 billion annually. The tragic waste of agricultural resources and tax dollars can be avoided by encouraging more compact, efficient growth in the Central Valley. Basic goals that would improve the bottom line for Central Valley agriculture and taxpayers are: Housing developments that make more efficient use of land; commercial development and public facilities that minimize the amount of farmland and water they consume; new development that is contiguous to existing developed areas; maximum infill development of vacant and underused land within city limits. A GIS database created to generate and manage data on existing land uses and spatial relationships was used to characterize current growth patterns in the region and to calculate probabilities for future development. With stronger planning and political leadership supporting a compact-development pattern, the projected land loss could be reduced by more than half. The use of reasonable urban design strategies can reduce the total farmland loss to 475,000 acres, of which only 266,000 are prime or statewide important farmland. An economic analysis of low density versus compact urban growth projects by 2040 a growth of 8 million new residents, while the growth of employment is estimated at more than 3.2 million jobs.nike

Date: Sunday, October 1, 1995 , Author: Edward Thompson, Jr. , Page Numbers: i, 139
Nid: 30361
Title: Alternatives for Future Urban Growth in California's Central Valley: The Bottom Line for Agriculture and Taxpayers, Summary Report
Publisher: Davis, CA: American Farmland Trust , Publication Name: AFT Publication
Body:

California’s Central Valley is the nation’s most important agricultural resource, producing 250 different commodities worth more than $13 billion a year. The valley’s population is expected to triple between now and the year 2040, putting tremendous pressure on agricultural land and public services. Low-density urban sprawl would consume more than 1 million acres of farmland by 2040 and could reduce the value of agricultural products grown in the Central Valley by about $2.1 billion annually. The tragic waste of agricultural resources and tax dollars can be avoided by encouraging more compact, efficient growth in the Central Valley. Basic goals that would improve the bottom line for Central Valley agriculture and taxpayers are: Housing developments that make more efficient use of land; commercial development and public facilities that minimize the amount of farmland and water they consume; new development that is contiguous to existing developed areas; maximum infill development of vacant and underused land within city limits. A GIS database created to generate and manage data on existing land uses and spatial relationships was used to characterize current growth patterns in the region and to calculate probabilities for future development. With stronger planning and political leadership supporting a compact-development pattern, the projected land loss could be reduced by more than half. The use of reasonable urban design strategies can reduce the total farmland loss to 475,000 acres, of which only 266,000 are prime or statewide important farmland. An economic analysis of low density versus compact urban growth projects by 2040 a growth of 8 million new residents, while the growth of employment is estimated at more than 3.2 million jobs.Air Jordan

Date: Sunday, October 1, 1995 , Author: Edward Thompson, Jr. , Page Numbers: 17
Nid: 37588
Title: America's Agricultural Land Base in 1977, Interim Report Number Five / National Agricultural Lands Study
Publisher: Washington, DC: National Agricultural Lands Study , Publication Name: National Agricultural Lands Study , Date: Monday, December 1, 1980 , Author: United States Department of Agriculture and the President's Council on Environmental Quality , Page Numbers: 28
Nid: 37966
Title: America's Conservation Reserve Program: Rural Planning or Just Another Subsidy?
Publisher: Bristol, UK: Journal of Rural Studies , Publication Name: Journal of Rural Studies
Body:

The Conservation Reserve Program was created by Congress in 1985 to remove highly erodible cropland from production and thus reduce soil erosion and crop surpluses. The program is aimed at enrolling 40- 45 million acres out of an estimated 118 million acres of highly erodible cropland. As of November 1987, 23 million acres had been placed in the Conservation Reserve. The program is strictly voluntary. Landowners may receive an annual rental payment and half the cost of approved conservation measures. In return, landowners must retire highly erodible cropland from production for ten years. Over 200,000 landowners have each enrolled an average of 110 acres at a cost to the U.S. Treasury of more than $50,000 per landowner. The total cost of the Conservation Reserve Program currently exceeds $12 billion. Whether the long-term benefits of the program can justify the cost remains in doubt. The program has an effective life of only ten years. A more direct and effective long-term means of reducing soil erosion and crop surpluses might be to have the federal government purchase farmland to create a national strategic cropland reserve.Kobe 13 A.D. Shoes

Date: Friday, January 1, 1988 , Author: Thomas L. Daniels , Page Numbers: 405-411
Nid: 29783
Title: America's Diverse Family Farms: Assorted Sizes, Types and Situations
Publisher: Washington, DC: USDA Economic Research Service , Publication Name: ERS Agricultural Information Bulletin , Date: Tuesday, May 1, 2001 , Author: Economic Research Service , Page Numbers: 8
Nid: 29091
Title: American Farmland Trust Spring 2008
Publisher: Washington, DC: American Farmland Trust , Publication Name: American Farmland
Body:

American Farmland is published four times a year by American Farmland Trust, a nonprofit membership organization founded in 1980 to protect the nation’s agricultural resources. AFT works to stop the loss of productive farmland and to promote farming practices that lead to a healthy environment.

Basic annual membership dues are $25. Membership benefits include a year’s subscription to the award-­winning magazine, American Farmland, and a 10-percent discount on all AFT publications and merchandise. Membership contributions are tax deductible to the extent provided
by law. To become a member, visit www.farmland.org/support/join.

For submissions and letters to the editor, contact:

Kirsten Ferguson
Editor, American Farmland magazine
American Farmland Trust
112 Spring Street
Saratoga Springs, New York 12866
kferguson@farmland.orgKobe 11 ELite Glowing

Date: Thursday, May 1, 2008 , Author: American Farmland Trust , Page Numbers: 26
Nid: 37154
Title: American Farmland: Fall 2007
Publisher: Washington, DC: American Farmland Trust , Publication Name: American Farmland
Body:

American Farmland is published four times a year by American Farmland Trust, a nonprofit membership organization founded in 1980 to protect the nation’s agricultural resources. AFT works to stop the loss of productive farmland and to promote farming practices that lead to a healthy environment.

Basic annual membership dues to American Farmland Trust are $25. Membership benefits include a year’s subscription to the print edition of American Farmland. Membership contributions are tax deductible to the extent provided by law. To become a member, visit www.farmland.org/support/join.

For submissions and letters to the editor, contact:

Kirsten Ferguson
Editor, American Farmland magazine
American Farmland Trust
112 Spring Street
Saratoga Springs, New York 12866
kferguson@farmland.orgAdidas NMD Boost

Date: Monday, October 1, 2007 , Author: American Farmland Trust , Page Numbers: 36
Nid: 36803
Title: American Farmland: Summer 2007
Publisher: Washington, DC: American Farmland Trust , Publication Name: American Farmland
Body:

American Farmland is published four times a year by American Farmland Trust, a nonprofit membership organization founded in 1980 to protect the nation’s agricultural resources. AFT works to stop the loss of productive farmland and to promote farming practices that lead to a healthy environment.

Basic annual membership dues to American Farmland Trust are $25. Membership benefits include a year’s subscription to the print edition of American Farmland. Membership contributions are tax deductible to the extent provided by law. To become a member, visit www.farmland.org/support/join.

For submissions and letters to the editor, contact:

Kirsten Ferguson
Editor, American Farmland magazine
American Farmland Trust
112 Spring Street
Saratoga Springs, New York 12866
kferguson@farmland.orgAir Jordan VIII 8 Shoes

Date: Friday, June 1, 2007 , Author: American Farmland Trust , Page Numbers: 28
Nid: 33732
Title: American Farmland: Winter 2008
Publisher: Washington, DC: American Farmland Trust , Publication Name: American Farmland
Body:

American Farmland is published four times a year by American Farmland Trust, a nonprofit membership organization founded in 1980 to protect the nation’s agricultural resources. AFT works to stop the loss of productive farmland and to promote farming practices that lead to a healthy environment.

Basic annual membership dues to American Farmland Trust are $25. Membership benefits include a year’s subscription to the print edition of American Farmland. Membership contributions are tax deductible to the extent provided by law. To become a member, visit www.farmland.org/support/join.

For submissions and letters to the editor, contact:

Kirsten Ferguson
Editor, American Farmland magazine
American Farmland Trust
112 Spring Street
Saratoga Springs, New York 12866
kferguson@farmland.orgNew Balance

Date: Friday, February 1, 2008 , Author: American Farmland Trust , Page Numbers: 28
Nid: 37033
Title: An Agricultural Critique of The National Agricultural Lands Study
Publisher: Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press , Publication Name: Land Economics , Date: Monday, February 1, 1982 , Author: P.M. Raup , Page Numbers: 260-274
Nid: 29748
Title: An Analysis of Food-Chain Demand for Differentiated Farm Commodities: Implications for the Farm Sector
Publisher: Washington, DC: USDA Rural Business and Cooperatives Program , Date: Friday, February 23, 2007 , Author: Kathleen Painter , Page Numbers: 32
Nid: 37275
Title: An Analysis of Proposition 13 Impacts on California Land Conservation Act Participation
Publisher: Madison, Wi: University of Wisconsin Press , Publication Name: Land Economics , Date: Wednesday, February 1, 1984 , Author: H.F. Carman , Page Numbers: 360-366
Nid: 29746
Title: An Answer to Sediment Pollution
Publisher: Norm Berg
Body:

From a speech given at the Sedimentation Control Institute, Virginia.

Date: Tuesday, December 12, 1972 , Author: Norman A. Berg , Page Numbers: 11
Nid: 31273
Title: An Answer to Sediment Pollution
Publisher: Norm Berg
Body:

From a speech given at the Maryland Sediment Control Institute in Gaithersburg, Maryland.

Date: Wednesday, October 17, 1973 , Author: Norman A. Berg , Page Numbers: 11
Nid: 31274
Title: An Assessment and Recommendations for Preservation and Management of City-Owned Agricultural Land
Publisher: Puyallup: WA: American Farmland Trust , Publication Name: AFT Publication , Date: Sunday, January 1, 2006 , Author: American Farmland Trust , Page Numbers: 100
Nid: 30786
Title: An Economic Perspective on Values and Natural Resource Policy
Publisher: DeKalb, IL: American Farmland Trust , Publication Name: Center for Agriculture in the Environment Working Paper
Body:

This CAE working paper considers the applications of normative and positive economics to natural resource problems. It concludes with a light hearted "users guide" for the effective involvement of economists in natural resource management. As a normative science, economics can help reveal how resources should used. As a positive science, economics provides a useful set of concepts and analytical tools that help predict patterns of resource use within a defined set of market and decision rules. Economists can be particularly effective participants in multi-disciplinary teams involved in both management and analysis of public and private resources if the author's "user's guide" is followed. Areas of high priority for natural resource economists include: 1) working towards a better understanding of the policy process as a precursor to improved natural resource policy; 2) developing ways to infer intensity or extent of effective demand for natural resource attributes that are not captured in a market price e.g. charging individual citizens for the perceived benefits of endangered species habitat; 3) more work on the economics of cooperation to aid developing better, more practical systems for managing common property resources like rangeland; and studying the effect of changing incentives on the choices made by rangeland users.ADIDAS

Date: Saturday, February 1, 1997 , Author: Lawrence W. Libby , Page Numbers: 7
Nid: 29766
Title: An Empirical Model of Urban Fringe Land Use
Publisher: Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press , Publication Name: Land Economics , Date: Wednesday, February 1, 1989 , Author: D.P. McMillen , Page Numbers: 138-145
Nid: 29737
Title: An Overview of Conservation and Agricultural Policy: Questions from the Past and Observations About the Present
Publisher: DeKalb, IL: American Farmland Trust , Publication Name: Center for Agriculture in the Environment Working Paper
Body:

This paper addresses conservation policies and conservation problem areas from the past and present. It begins with an overview of the challenges facing conservation during the 1930s and 1940s. The paper continues by tracking the emergence of the Soil Conservation Service. As SCS began taking over functions other agencies, turf battles began. SCS broadened its mission, leading to conflicts with extension, interior Forest Service, among other agencies. Conservation at that time was defined as what SCS decided to do. Gradually conservation districts developed and evolved, their importance and role in conservation and democracy intertwined. The issue of property rights emerged as some saw individual rights pitted against other people's proposition to use the land for soil conservation purposes. The final sections in the paper take the issues of conservation to the present and discuss the relevance of questions from the past to issues of present and future.nike

Date: Wednesday, July 1, 1998 , Author: Otto Doering , Page Numbers: 12
Nid: 29773

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